Python Bytes
Python Bytes is a weekly podcast hosted by Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken. The show is a short discussion on the headlines and noteworthy news in the Python, developer, and data science space.

Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken
Software How-To   Podcasts   Technology  

Latest Episode
You can check more episode on Publisher's website

#69 Digging into StackOverflow's 2018 survey results

Python Bytes 69

Sponsored by DigitalOcean:

Brian #1: pynb: Jupyter Notebooks as plain Python code with embedded Markdown text

  • pynb lets you manage Jupyter notebooks as plain Python code with embedded Markdown text, enabling:
    • Python development environment: Use your preferred IDE/editor, ensure style compliance, navigate, refactor, and test your notebooks as regular Python code.
    • Version control: Track changes, review pull requests and merge conflicts as with regular Python code. The cell outputs are stored separately and don't interfere with versioning.
    • Consistent execution state: Never lose track again of the execution state. Notebooks are always executed from clean iPython kernels and the cell execution is cached.
  • You also get parameterized notebooks with batch and programmatic execution.

Michael #2: Microsoft’s quantum computing language is now available for macOS

  • New language Q# (snippet examples)
  • How do you run a quantum app?
  • Based on topological qubits and quantum computers
  • Now out on macOS & Linux
  • Need to use VS Code (and vs code extension)
  • Comes with Python interoperability (only other language)
  • Also in Jupyter
  • Some real-world examples. See this Wired article.
    • D-wave
    • IBM is making quantum computers commercially available. Since 2016, it has offered researchers the chance to run experiments on a five-qubit quantum computer via the cloud and at the end of 2017 started making its 20-qubit system available online too.

Brian #3: pytest talk in Spanish

  • "pytest: recommendations, basic packages for testing in Python and Django"
  • By A. Vallbona (@avallbona) From PyConES 2017
  • with English slides, and video in Spanish.
  • Some of the topics covered:
    • pytest-django
    • model-mommy to easily create fixtures based on django models
    • pytest-lazy-fixture allows the use the fixtures as parameters to parameterize
    • pytest-mock, pytest-cov, pytest-flake8
    • freezegun to helps us to "freeze" time
    • eradicate to eliminate commented code
    • pytest-xdist to run tests in parallel

Bonus pytest topic:

Michael #4: StackOverflow Developer Survey Results 2018

  • Sample size: Over 100,000 developers
  • 55% contribute to open source
  • 64% have CS degrees
  • Experience and Belonging
    • Connection to other devs (increasing over time)
    • Competing with peers (decreasing over time)
    • Not as good as my peers (decreasing over time)
  • How Much Time Do Developers Spend on a Computer? Most: 9-12 hours
  • Python beats C# in usage for the first time
  • Languages:
    • Most loved: #1 Rust, #2 Kotlin, #3 Python
    • Most dreaded: VB 6 and CoffeeScript
    • Most wanted: #1 Python 25%, #JavaScript 19%, #3 Go 16%
  • Databases:
    • Loved: PostgreSQL
    • Dreaded: IBM Db2, Memcached, and Oracle
    • Most wanted: MongoDB
  • Editor: VS Code
  • Dev OSes:
    • Windows: 49%
    • macOS: 27%
    • Linux: 23%

Brian #5: demoshell

  • @doughellmann
  • Doug Hellman (@doughellmann) announces demoshell
    • Inspired by a tweet from @genehack “Hey, speakers, if you're doing live demos in a shell, clear the screen after every command to get the prompt back at the top, so folks in the back can see what you're doing.”
  • demoshell is a simplified shell for live demonstrations. It always shows the command prompt at the top of the screen and pushes command output down instead of letting it scroll up.
  • In his words: “I put it up there to start a discussion. I’d be happy if a bunch of people showed up and wanted to take it over and actually turn it into something useful. I invite people to give it a look. And warn them that too much interest is going to be met with commit privileges on the repo. :-)”

Michael #6: Clear statement on Python 2 EOL

  • Will there be a period where Py2.7 is in security-only status before hitting EOL?
  • via Nicola Iarocci‏ @nicolaiarocci
    • Yay, @gvanrossum makes it adamantly clear: “Let's not play games with semantics. The way I see the situation for 2.7 is that EOL is January 1st, 2020, and there will be no updates, not even source-only security patches, after that date.”
  • Support (from the core devs, the PSF, and stops completely on that date.

Follow up and other news



  • A couple of recent episodes on Test & Code focusing on project test development:
    • What tests to write first
    • Prioritize software tests with RCRCRC
    • Upcoming topics will include beefing up test coverage with things like equivalence partitioning, boundary value analysis, state transition diagrams, state tables, negative testing, …
    • Also learning a lot about developing an open source project and all the tools surrounding that. I’ll discuss those topics in episodes as well.
    • Project used in both episodes, cards : a project task tracking / todo list app that will be expanded as I go along talking about different test and software development topics.
2018-03-18 08:00:00 UTC

About This Site  Privacy Policy


the Apple logo, iPhone, iPod touch, and iTunes are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.